A MOTHER AND HER CUB

BY BRITTANY FUCIK

A Mother and Her Cub.jpg

Woodcut Print.

This is a traditional woodcut print on Rives BFK Paper. It is part of a semester long printmaking project where I am exploring myths and ideas surrounding polar bears. As the first installment, this print is a mother bear carrying her cub, as they start their first month after leaving the den for the first time.


LEAN ON ME MURAL 

IDEA BY LILLI HIME

In an effort to spread positivity, the Lean On Me Art Mural asked people to write the name of someone in the St. Edward’s community that gives them hope. This could be a fellow student, organization, professor, faculty, or staff member. We created a visual representation of what a strong, close-knit community we have on this campus and a reminder that you always have someone to lean on. The mural was hung in the Munday Library during finals week in the fall semester of 2016.


VERSIONS 

BY JENNIFER SLAVIK

A single version of art may be perceived in different moods. Through the use of a variety of colors, several attitudes are created from a single piece of art. In the original painting, some may see happy, cotton candy pinkness, others maybe see pain through the dragging brush strokes, some even may feel melancholy through the contrast between the serious facial layout and the vibrant, lively color. This is an attempt to take the abstraction of psychological projection and translate it into the concrete of different art forms.


INSIDE OUT MASKS PROJECT

BY LILLI HIME

Traditionally, masks serve the purpose of deception. A person can hide their truth behind them, conceal all their insecurities and fears. This project turned the conventional definition on its head by creating masks that peel back our guarded exterior to reveal one’s internal struggle. Inspired by an art therapy for soldiers dealing with PTSD, the Inside Out Masks Project asks students to consider whatever deep-seated issue they’re facing in life at the moment and gives them the chance to express it. Given free range to use a variety of shapes, colors, and whatever other material available, students are able to express the issues that otherwise is pushed down.

I want to extend my sincerest thanks to all the people who part took in this project for allowing yourselves to be vulnerable and being so honest. My hopes for this project are just to show that vulnerable side of people we so rarely see so we can really connect and empathize with our fellow human.


UNTITLED

BY MAKAYLA DUTTON


UNTITLED

BY AMY TRUONG

This piece is meant to pay homage to the positive, strong, and proactive culture that is prevalent in Austin. I tried to achieve that with the focus on optimistic quotes and emphasize the patriotic aspect in Austin's political culture with the main color scheme of red, white, and blue. I hope this also reminds everyone that even a simple action can make a significant impact on not only on the society around us, but on ourselves as well. Be open-minded and enrich yourself with opportunities of growth and gaining new knowledge.


MEMORY IN INVISIBLE INK

BY LILLI HIME

    It was the second New Literati meeting when I remember one of our kiddos was saying she was hesitant to try her hand at photography for us because she wasn’t sure if it’d be good enough. I told her to do it because New Literati isn’t about perfection, pretty words, or pretty pictures. It’s about expression and artistic experimentation. Trying new things and getting your work out there. There’s no better place to do this.

    It made me realize as an artist, I hadn’t really tried anything out of my word infested comfort zone in a while, so who was I to be preaching this stuff? So, in an effort to back up what I say, I tried to sketch an old picture of the orphanage in China I am from. I thought if this is going to be my first attempt at art, it should at least be personal. I drew blank blocks over spots that had Chinese signs because I can’t understand those signs. I wasn’t raised in the culture, so they represent something lost. It’s in black and white because, not only could I not find colored pencils, but because I thought to color in a place that I could not remember would be disingenuous. And I just like sketching.


PORTRAITS

BY AMY TONDRE

 

"Poor Little Star" is a scene of intergalactic communication between myself and a star who is distressed. The inspiration came from Religious art and listening to Plantasia (music that resembles Nintendo game scores, with the added benefit that it helps your plants grow). The second piece, "The Plants They Surround Her" was an idea born from the first piece except it manifested as a portrait of my friend Logan, who quite literally surrounds herself with plants. This piece also features a sort of communication between Logan and the plants who are stretching to her.


NO EVILS

GRAPHIC ART

BY LOGAN STALLINGS

Hear no evil, see no evil, speak no evil. Inspired by "The Three Wise Monkeys," and ancient Chinese proverb. I used the juxtaposition of the symbols of skulls and geometric crystals, comparing what was once living something that never was alive, to portray an eery feel.


A SERIES OF DIGITIZED SKETCHES

BY AMY TONDRE


SKY SERIES

BY LOGAN STALLINGS

In this series of collages, through the use of similar color pallets and horizon lines, I wanted to convey the feeling of a cohesive blue sky. By using the same blue tented undertones, a sense of movement and travel is created. Carrying the eye through the three different settings in a natural manner, the three pieces are unified by symbolism and color pallet, showing that they are all under the same sky. 


SELF NOT OTHERS

BY ALEX CLARKE

This illustration is a reaction piece to William Stafford's poem "Ask Me?"


RASCALS

BY JASMINE KIM

I like to draw weird animals wearing cool clothes.


FLOWERS SERIES

BY LOGAN STALLINGS

I wanted to show organic shape through the use of plain line based flowers. The four different images work together as a whole, relating to life and death in the same way that flowers bloom and wither. The lack of color adds to the simplicity of the designs, and emphasis on line, both bold and subtle used to create the organic and symbolic shapes. Repeating the same images with various shades of pink add to the idea of the transition from one stage of life to another. 


TACTILE PORTRAIT

BY LOGAN STALLINGS

“Tactile Portrait” is a self portrait, using various mixed medias including gouache, graphite, spray paint, and pastels. This was a blind portrait, created by feeling and understanding the physical qualities of the face without looking at the canvas.  Through the understanding of the physical and tactile elements of the face, this piece exhibits color relationships, mark making, and expressionistic forms.  


CONTOUR SERIES

BY LOGAN STALLINGS

The contour is a form of line drawing in which one long continuous line is used to describe shape and form. I used contour to create portraits through the application of active line, line variation and positive/negative space. I wanted to create portraits of various St. Edward's students focusing on form and fluidity of descriptive line. In these portraits, I capitalized on facial features but left out the eyes. I did this to create a sense of androgyny and anonymity because I believe that the eyes are the most personal part of any portrait and that taking them out creates a distance between the viewer and subject.